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Summer Favorite, Baja Fish Tacos!

Summer Favorite, Baja Fish Tacos!

One of our favorite meals in the whole wide world is Baja Shrimp Tacos, these delicacies are an explosion of flavor for any discerning palate!

 

Baja Fish Tacos a la Casa Mexicana 

Ingredients:

  • Komali Tortillas Taquera 500gr
  • Fish filets, white firm fish like pescada, this can be done with shrimp
  • 2 cups of flour
  • ½ tsp of baking powder
  • 1 tsp of salt
  • ½ tsp of pepper
  • ½ tsp of garlic powder
  • ½ cup of cold dark beer (ideally this is Negra Modelo or any lager style beer)
  • Oil for frying 

Step 1: Prepare your fish filets, they should be around 1 inch wide and 4-inch-long strips, we want the fish to fit in our taco because it will gain extra padding with the batter. Pat dry your fish and store in a container wrapped with a paper towel.

Step 2: Prepare the batter, add a cup of flour, ½ tsp of baking powder, a tsp of salt, a ½ tsp of pepper and ½ tsp of garlic powder, ½ cup of cold dark beer. Mix the flour salt and dry condiments in a medium bowl, gradually add the cold beer while whisking, do not over work the batter, you can leave some small lumps of flour it will help with crispiness. The consistency of the batter should be that of a thick pancake batter. Best to let the batter rest for 5-10 min allowing the baking powder to activate which will make for a crispier batter.

Step 3: Heat your oil in a deep pan it should be deep enough to cover the fish 90%, to test the heat of your oil, put a tiny bit of your beer batter in the oil, when the oil is ready the batter will float and be golden brown.

Step 4: Take your fish out of the fridge make sure no condensation has formed any water will make the oil splatter, salt and pepper the fish, first dip them in the white flour, then in the beer batter, slowly release them into the hot oil, fry until golden about 3-4 minutes, don’t overcrowd the pan, place your crispy fish on a cooling rack to keep the coating nice and crisp!

Enjoy with toppings like pico de gallo, thinly sliced cabbage, guacamole and chipotle crema!

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Healthy Baked Flautas

Healthy Baked Flautas

Looking for a fun and tasty Mexican recipe? We got you! Try our baked flautas for a healthier and refreshing option of this delicious treat!

Casa Mexicana’s Baked Flautas Recipe:

Komali Tostada Tortillas
Neutral oil
Toothpicks

For fillings:
Shredded chicken
Chorizo mexicano

Toppings:
Salsa Roja / Verde
Crema
Lettuce
Avocado

Instructions:
Heat your oven to 180* and prepare your fillings, most common are shredded chicken, potato, beans or cheese, today we did chorizo with potato. Heat a pan to medium heat, add a couple of teaspoons of oil, pass your tortillas through the oil until they become soft, about 2 seconds on each side. These tortillas are very thin, specially made to fry or bake for tostadas or flautas. Place two spoonfuls of your filling on the edge of the tortilla, roll tightly and pin with a toothpick. Place all your flautas in a baking sheet and bake for 8-10 min or until crispy.

Enjoy with toppings like salsa roja, crema, lettuce and avocado.

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Mole Rojo para Enamorarse

Mole Rojo para Enamorarse

Every time I think of mole my memory goes first to my paternal grandmother and great inspiration, my Tita, as she was the ultimate mole queen and cook galore. My second thought goes to Laura Esquivel's novel 'Como Agua para Chocolate' or 'Like Water for Chocolate', the main character, also named Tita (crazy coincidence, maybe all Tita's make the best mole) says something about love which I think can be applied to cooking, especially the cooking of such an intricately delicate dish like mole, she says "El amor no se piensa, o se siente o no se siente" or "You don't have to think about love, either you feel it or you don't". When you endeavor on a dish like mole, the task sometimes seems so daunting with almost 30 ingredients on your list, that you feel it or you don't. Like Tita in Laura Esquivel's novel when she wasn't feeling it her food could basically poison her guests but when she was in the mood her guests could feel it from very deep within ;)

So I invite you to be brave and try one of Mexico's most beautiful dishes the Mole, and to send you off with extra courage and love I share with you the Mole Rojo, so make it with love, for a loved one, a husband, boyfriend, or soon to be, and you'll see how they'll be swooning after just one bite!

Ingredients

Serves 10-12 people

9 oz / 255g mulato chiles, stemmed and seeded
Pinch of aniseeds
Pinch of cumin seeds
2 black peppercorns
2 allspice berries
2 cloves
½ cinnamon stick
4 to 6 Tbsp / 50 to 75g lard
2 whole chickens, cut into serving-size pieces
¼ cup / 30g pine nuts
3 Tbsp / 30 g pumpkin seeds
Scant ¼ cup / 30g black raisins
3 Tbsp / 30 g almonds
¼ cup / 30g hazelnuts
3 Tbsp / 30 g peanuts
¼ cup / 30g pecans
3 Tbsp / 30 g sesame seeds
6 Ritz or other rich-tasting crackers
1 corn tortilla
2 slices fluffy white bread (dinner roll or ciabatta)
½ white onion, coarsely chopped
2 Roma tomatoes, cored and quartered
1 very ripe (black) plantain, peeled and cut into chunks
1 large garlic clove
5 oz / 140g semisweet chocolate
¼ cup / 60ml water
6 cups / 1.4L chicken stock

Directions

First, lightly toast the chiles by placing them on a hot, ungreased comal or in a skillet over medium heat, turning them constantly as they heat up and begin to release their fragrance. Before they turn brown, remove them from the heat and submerge them in a bowl of water to let them soak and soften while you prepare everything else.

Next, you are going to toast all of the spices on your hot, dry comal or in an ungreased skillet. You should do this in batches because they have different toasting times, beginning with the ones that will toast the fastest: the anise and cumin. As soon as you can smell these toasted seeds, take them off the comal or skillet and place them in a spice grinder. Now do the same with the peppercorns, allspice, cloves, and cinnamon stick. After they’re toasted, add them to your spice grinder and grind the spices together. Dump the ground spices into a large bowl. You will be frying things in batches that you will be adding to this bowl. Eventually, all of this will go into the blender, but for now, you need a place to store the mole ingredients as you prepare them to be blended together.

Now sear the chicken that you are going to cook in the sauce. Melt 4 Tbsp / 50g of the lard in a Dutch oven or large heavy-bottom skillet over medium-high heat. When the lard has melted completely and is shimmering, place as many pieces of the chicken in the pot as you can fit without crowding. The goal here is to brown each piece, so be sure they’re not overlapping. Sprinkle them lightly with salt and flip them over so that both sides get seared. When they look golden, using tongs, transfer them to a platter and repeat with the rest of the chicken pieces, adding more lard to the pan as needed.

The chicken should be just seared and not be cooked though at this stage because it will continue cooking in the mole sauce.

Once you’re finished searing the chicken, keep whatever grease and drippings remain in the Dutch oven or skillet to fry other things. You want about ½ inch / 12mm of shimmering oil in the bottom of the pan, and you will have to add more lard as needed. You are going to be frying the nuts and seeds in batches because, depending on their sizes, they will cook at different rates. You are looking for each thing to turn golden but not dark brown.

Begin with the pine nuts, pumpkin seeds, and raisins. Once you can smell the fragrance of these nuts and seeds and they look golden, remove them with a slotted spoon and place them in the big bowl with the spices. Now fry the almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, and pecans until they are fragrant and golden and then add them to the big bowl. Fry the sesame seeds by themselves, being extra careful to monitor them the whole time and moving them around with a wooden spoon or spatula as they fry because they can burn quickly. Add the sesame seeds to the big bowl.

Remember to add more lard to the pan when you need it, since the nuts and seeds will likely have soaked it up. Once the added lard has melted and is shimmering, fry the Ritz crackers very briefly, because they burn fast, then the tortilla, and finally the bread, placing it all in the big bowl with all of the previously toasted and fried ingredients. Add more lard if needed and fry the onion, tomatoes, plantain, and garlic until everything is golden and a bit stewy, then add it all to the big bowl.

In a small saucepot, combine the chocolate with the water and heat until the chocolate melts. Turn off the heat while you blend your sauce ingredients. Due to the amount of volume here, you are going to need to blend your sauce in batches. Know that from this point on, everything is getting blended together and then simmered, so the order in which you blend things doesn’t much matter.

You want a ratio of about 1:1 of stock to solid ingredients. I would suggest blending a couple of cups of solids at a time (4 cups / 960ml total, including the stock). When the contents of the blender are liquefied, dump it into your largest stockpot and then repeat the process. Finally, blend the soaked chiles with the remaining stock and add this to your pot, along with the melted chocolate, and stir well to combine.

Bring the mole to a simmer over medium-low heat. Drop the chicken into the pot and cover. Let it simmer for 20 to 25 minutes, then serve. The mole can be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days or frozen for up to 3 months.

Recipe Courtesy of “My Mexico City Kitchen” Cookbook.
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Salsa Taquera

Salsa Taquera

This is the classic salsa they serve at any taco stand in Mexico, spicy with its chile de arbol base perfect carne asada tacos!

 Ingredients:

3 tomatoes

1/2 white onion

Casa Mexicana Chile de árbol to taste (we recommend 4-5)

1 garlic clove

Salt to taste

2 cups Water

 

Preparation:

  1. Place a pot over high heat, add the water, tomatoes, chili, onion and garlic together, the water level should be the same level as the ingredients.
  2. Cook all the ingredients covered for 15 minutes, we will know that they will be ready when the tomato has started peeling out and the chili has lost its hardness.
  3. Stir the ingredients every 7-10 minutes, so that all the vegetables are cooked.
  4. Let the pot sit and cool for a few minutes before adding the ingredients to the blender.
  5. Add salt to taste.
  6. Blend everything and enjoy with your tacos.
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Romeritos with Nopales, your new Christmas favorite!

Romeritos with Nopales, your new Christmas favorite!

Are you tired of the same old Christmas dishes every year? Do you want to debut a dish that will be a definite showstopper? How about a traditional Mexican dish called Romeritos made with Nopales, or Mexican cactus paddle. It is a dish that will WOW everyone and will appease even the Vegans at your Christmas table!

Romeritos con Nopales

Ingredients

(Serves 2 to 4 people)
4 cups rosemary or romeritos
2 cups Doña Rosa nopalitos (cactus paddle), cut into strips
1/2 white onions
1 pinch sodium bicarbonate/baking soda
2 cups potatoes, peeled
1 cup dry shrimp
1 egg
Enough oil to fry
Salt to taste

Directions

Place the romeritos in a saucepan with water to cover, cook them over medium heat without being completely cooked.

In a pot, place the nopales and the onions, cover with water and the pinch of sodium bicarbonate/baking soda, together with salt. Let them boil over high heat, reduce the flame, cover and cook over low heat until soft, 15-20 minutes.
Cook the potatoes in boiling water until they soften and you can easily chop them with a fork, about 15 minutes.
Cut the heads and tails of the shrimp and reserve them. Soak the shrimp in hot water for 10 minutes.
Dry grind the heads and shrimp tails, beat the egg to the nougat point and mix it with the shrimp power, form pancakes and fry in oil.

In a large pot, dissolve the Doña Maria Mole Poblano Paste in the water in which the shrimp soaked. Add the romeritos, nopales, potatoes and shrimp. Cook over medium heat and season with salt to taste.

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How to make corn tortillas 101

How to make corn tortillas 101

Tortillas, the staple in every Mexican table, they breathe life into Mexican dishes, accompany through all our happiness and sorrys. They never disappoint, especially homemade tortillas, when they puff up perfectly in a heated comal. Here is the mother of all recipes, because every Mexican dish starts with a tortilla, so we will call it Masa Madre! Here is the true and tested way to make masa for corn tortillas, sopes, gorditas, empanadas, chochoyotes (don't worry we'll get to those too), and of course a Christmas specialty the tamales, its easy, its versatile and we can't live without it!

Ingredients

Makes about 12 tortillas

2 cups / 260g masa harina

1 to 1¼ cups / 240 to 300ml water

1 tsp pinch of salt

Directions

In a medium bowl, combine the 1 cup / 240ml water with the salt then add the masa harina and mix well. Continue adding water 1 Tbsp at a time until you have formed a smooth and thick dough that has the consistency of stiff cookie dough.

Form 12 golf ball–size balls and lay a moist dish towel over them so they don’t dry out.

* This masa you can also use to make tamales, gorditas, corn empanadas, tlayudas, and other corn goodies!

Warm an ungreased comal or two skillets over medium heat.

Lay a precut sheet of plastic on the bottom of a tortilla press and place a ball of masa on top of the plastic. Place a second sheet of plastic on top of the ball and then squeeze the press firmly so that the dough is sandwiched between the two plates. You want the tortilla to be about ⅛ inch / 3mm thick. Open the press and remove the flattened masa, which will be stuck between the two sheets of plastic. Place it on your left palm (if you’re right-handed) and use your right hand to peel off the top sheet of plastic. Then flip it over and transfer it to your right hand, so that it rests in your right palm. Carefully peel off the other sheet of plastic, freeing the raw tortilla.

Gently deposit the raw tortilla onto the preheated comal or skillet. You should hear a faint sizzle as it hits the metal. Watch for the edge of the tortilla to begin turning opaque, a signal that it is cooking. When this happens (after 30 to 45 seconds), flip it to the other side and let it cook for 30 to 45 seconds, until the whole thing starts to turn opaque. Now flip it back to the first side and let it cook for a final 30 seconds. After the second flip, it should start to puff up a little, a sign that all of the water in the masa has evaporated and the tortilla is done.

Getting your technique down takes some fiddling. If the edges of your tortilla look grainy and dry, add 1 Tbsp water to your dough, massaging it in thoroughly. But don’t add too much water, or the masa will stick to the plastic and to the bottom of your pan. Make sure that your tortillas aren’t too thinly pressed and that the thickness is uniform, which makes it easier to flip them. You may also need to adjust the heat of your stove if you feel they’re cooking too quickly or too slowly. Once you get the moisture and temperature right, each tortilla should take a total of about 2 minutes to cook through.

As each tortilla is finished cooking, set it in a basket or a deep bowl and cover the growing stack with a dish towel to keep them warm as you add to it. Wrapped up well, in a basket or a box with a lid, they should stay warm for about 1 hour.

You can reheat a tortilla on a hot comal or in a skillet, flipping it a few times until it’s completely heated through. It’s okay if your tortilla gets a little charred. The black flecks add flavor. You can also reheat them in a stack. Begin by heating one tortilla. After you flip it, add another on top of the already hot side of the first one. After 30 seconds, flip them both together so that the cold side of the second one is now on the hot surface of the pan, and add a third tortilla to the top of the pile. Keep flipping and adding until you have as many warm tortillas as you need. There’s really no limit. Once they’re stacked, they will all keep each other warm.

Recipe Courtesy of Gabriela Camara's “My Mexico City Kitchen" Cookbook.

#MasaMexicana #TortillasMexicanas #Maseca #MaketheMasa #MasaMadre #FreshTortillas #TortillasfortheSoul

Tortillas FoodInspiration RecetasAutenticas RecetasMexicanas Tamales Masa Madre  Maseca

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Tamales Dulces con ate de membrillo y queijo de azeitaõ

Tamales Dulces con ate de membrillo y queijo de azeitaõ

Because we know you can't get enough of our sweetness, here we have one of our favorite savory sweet tamales with quince paste and in ode to our host country of Portugal, we will use a very traditional sheep's cheese called queijo de azeitaõ.

Ingredients

Makes about 12 tamales

2 cups / 260g masa harina, mixed with 1 to 1¼ cups / 240 to 300ml water (as directed on this page)

5 Tbsp / 70g butter, softened

⅓ cup / 65g granulated sugar

6 oz / 170g queijo de azeitaõ cheese

6 oz / 170g ate de membrillo / quince paste

Greek yogurt for garnish

Directions

Begin by placing your corn husks to soak in a large bowl of warm water to soften while you prepare the ingredients.

Place the fresh masa or mixed masa harina in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or, if you prefer to do this by hand with a whisk, in a large bowl. You want to whip up your masa to get as much air into it as you can, making it fluffy. The more it’s worked, the lighter the tamales will taste. After beating it for 3 to 4 minutes, add the butter 1 Tbsp at a time and continue to whip it until it’s well incorporated. Then add the sugar and mix for an additional 1 to 2 minutes.

Cut your azeitaõ cheese and ate de membrillo into 12 equal logs, approximately 2 x ½ inches / 5cm x 12mm. They should look like half of a string cheese stick. It’s not crucial that they be perfectly tidy and uniform as they will be tucked inside the tamales; you just want them to fit within the masa and for each tamal to have about the same amount of both cheese and quince paste.

Take your softened corn husks out of the water they’ve been soaking in, squeezing out any excess moisture. Open one up and place “about 3 Tbsp / 55g of the masa mixture in the center of the husk. Use the back of a spoon or a spatula to spread it into a rectangle that’s about 3 x 2 inches / 7.5 x 5cm and about ½ inch / 12mm tall. It doesn’t need to be precise, just big enough to hold the fillings with enough corn husk on all sides so that you can wrap it up and no filling will ooze out. Place one log of cheese and one log of quince paste at the center of the masa and then bring the sides of the corn husk together, sealing the filling inside the masa. Now fold up the bottom of the corn husk so that the whole tamal is contained “inside the corn husk, then roll it up from the side.

The tamal should be “closed” on the bottom and open on top. Use a second corn husk to bind it further. There really isn’t a science to wrapping tamales. What’s important is that the insides stay as tight as possible and that no masa comes out during steaming. Repeat this process with the rest of the masa and filling. If you want, you can cut one of the corn husks into ribbons and use these ribbons to tie up the tamales for extra insurance.

Once you’ve finished, place a steamer basket in a stockpot and add 2 to 3 inches / 5 to 7.5cm of water. Place all of your tamal packages in the pot and bring to a simmer. Cover the pot and let the tamales steam for 20 to 25 minutes, monitoring about halfway through the process to make sure that there is still a good inch or two of water at the bottom of the pan and adding more water if necessary. After 20 minutes, take one out and open it up to test if it’s done. Cut into one with a knife to ensure that the masa has the consistency of firm polenta and doesn’t ooze at all; the halves should cut cleanly and stay intact. Serve with a spoonful of the yogurt.

As with savory tamales, these can be cooked, stored in the refrigerator, and then reheated simply by steaming them again, and they will taste just as good as when they were freshly made.

Recipe Courtesy of Gabriela Camara's “My Mexico City Kitchen" Cookbook.

#TamalesMexicanos #NavidadesMexicanas #ChristmasSpirit #AtedeMembrillo #MaketheMasa

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Why you'll want to make Pozole for your next fiesta!

Why you'll want to make Pozole for your next fiesta!

Pozole is one of Mexico's most famous meals in a bowl, it's a favorite for the holidays, and any kind of parties! And as many party dishes conveniently its even better when prepared a day ahead, allowing you to sit, relax and enjoy your friends and family while the pozole simmers in the stove ready to serve.

 You can make it with chicken or pork or both, as well as white, green or red, the colors of our beautiful flag :) why it's also a dish that is served for our Fiestas Patrias, the 16th of September, contrary to popular belief not on the 5th of May. So now you can make your own pozole for your special celebrations, because pozole means sharing, happiness, laughter and of course lots of compliments after dinner!

Ingredients

Serves 12

 3 29-oz cans of hominy, drained and rinsed

2 3-pound chickens, cut into serving pieces (For Pork Pozole, substitute with 6-pounds pork shoulder/butt)

1 white onion
5 cilantro sprigs

Kosher or coarse sea salt

For the Chile Puree (what makes it red and spicy good),

2 ancho chiles, rinsed, stemmed and seeded

3 guajillo chiles, rinsed, stemme d and seeded

1/4 cup chopped white onion

3 garlic cloves

Pinch of ground cumin

2 whole cloves

1 teaspoon Kosher or coarse sea salt

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Accompaniments, as desired

5-6 limes
10 radishes, halved and thinly sliced

1 head romaine lettuce, thinly sliced

1/2 cup chopped white onion in small cubes

Dried ground chile, such as piquín

Dried Mexican oregano

Tortilla chips or tostadas

Refried beans

Directions

Place the chickens in a large pot and add water to cover by at least 2 inches. Add the onion, cilantro and 1 tablespoon of salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, partially covered, until the chicken is cooked through and tender, about 40 minutes. Drain, reserving cooking broth.

When the chicken is cool enough to handle, remove skin and bones and shred into bite-sized pieces. In the pot, combine the hominy and 2 cups of water with the shredded chicken and its broth. Taste for salt, add more if necessary and cook for 10 minutes or more; the pozole should be soupy.

Mexican cook's trick: Keep in mind that if you decide to substitute for the Pork option, the pork takes twice as long to cook, reserve the broth to add to the pozole.

For Chile Puree,

Place the chiles in a medium saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Simmer for 10 minutes or until soft. Place the chiles, along with 3.4 cups of their cooking liquid, the onion, garlic, cumin, cloves and salt in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Pass the puree through a fine-mesh strainer into a bowl, pressing on the solids with the back of the wooden spoon to extract as much liquid and essence as possible.

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the chile puree and bring to a boil, then simmer for 6-8 minutes, partially covered with a lid (because it will be pungently good you may cry), stirring occasionally, until thickened, remove from the heat.

Stir in the chile puree to the while pozole and cook for 20 minutes for the flavors to fully macerate. Taste and adjust the salt.

Serve the pozole in large soup bowls, with the garnishes in bowls on the table so guests can customize their pozole experience.

Hominy, or maíz cacahuacintle, also known as giant white corn or maíz mote pelado, looks like corn kernels gone wild. White and super meaty, these giant kernes are an excellent and healthy choice for any stew our soup. Hominy is rich in Vitamin b, has about 4g of fiber per single cup, almost half the calories than white rice (120 calories vs. 250 calories in rice), naturally gluten-free and virtually zero fat (1 gram per cup).

Recipe Courtesy of "Pati's Mexican Table" Cookbook.

Check out our online shop to stock up on the products needed for this recipe here or follow the links directly on the ingredients section!

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