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Northern Style Flour Tortillas

Northern Style Flour Tortillas

Northern Style Flour Tortillas

INGREDIENTS - makes 24 to 30 tortillas

4 cups all purpose flour (avoid flours with high protein content, anything under 13%)
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
2/3 cup vegetable shortening, lard, or room temperature butter
1 3/4 cup hot water

  1. Mix dry ingredients. Combine flour, salt, and baking powder in a large bowl.
  2. Add shortening. Add vegetable shortening (or whatever fat you are using) and rub it in with your fingers. It should resemble sand with a few pea-sized pieces of fat.
  3. Knead. Add water and mix to form a wet dough. It will be sticky. Turn out onto a unfloured work surface and knead for 5 minutes. It will be really sticky at first but eventually will form a smooth dough. Use a bench scraper to scrape the dough off the counter as you go if necessary.
  4. Let rest. Grease a large bowl place the dough inside and turn to coat in the oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 20 minutes. 
  5. Divide the dough. Pinch off a small piece of dough (a digital scale is really handy for this). The size of the piece will depend on how large your comal or skillet you will be cooking the tortillas on is (a little bigger than a golf ball) which give us 8-inch tortillas. Roll into smooth balls and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover with a clean kitchen cloth. 
  6. Heat the pan. Place a comal or other nonstick skillet over medium heat and let warm at least 3 minutes before you cook any tortillas on it. 
  7. Roll the tortillas. Place a ball of dough on a lightly floured counter and flour a rolling pin. Roll each ball into a very thin circle. You should be able to see your hand through it. The thinner the better. 
  8. Cook. As you roll place each tortilla on the hot, dry skillet and cook undisturbed until toasted and bubbles cover the surface, about 1 minute. Flip and cook another minute on the other side. Keep warm in a clean towel and repeat with remaining dough.
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Entomatadas alla Pollock

Entomatadas alla Pollock

This simple homey Mexican recipe is a comfort food for all who know it, entomatadas like enchiladas or enfrijoladas or enmoladas, all carry the same idea but a different sauce.

Entomatadas have a simple non spicy tomato sauce that reminds one of hugs from la abuela!

Entomatadas alla Pollock

Tortillas Komali 15cm Tradicional

3 Chile Guajillo

2 Chile Arbol

3 tomatoes

1/2 onion

1 garlic 

Oil for frying

salt to taste 

Fillings: shredded chicken, cheese, or beans

Toppings: crema, chile oil, lettuce, crumbly cheese

Instructions:

1. Prepare your salsa, clean your chiles by taking out the seeds and veins, soak them in hot water until soft. Add all tomatoes, onion, garlic and chiles in your blender and blend until very smooth, salt to taste. 

2. Fry off your salsa until it gets a bright red color, then fry off your tortillas until they become flexible and soft. Set them aside.

3. Set up your plate with some salsa at the bottom, dip the tortillas in the salsa and fill them with your desired filling

4. Top them with more salsa and your desired toppings.

Provecho!

Abuela’s Tip: Anytime you’re making salsa Macha or chile oil in your blender is a good time to make this simple tomato sauce, since your blender will be coated with an amazing residual goodness, blend the tomatoes/onion/garlic to clean out your blender and make this recipe without using extra Chiles.

 

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Easy Bean Soup or Tlatlapas

Easy Bean Soup or Tlatlapas

Why on this hot Summer day are we craving soup, you may ask?

As early as I remember my mother bless her heart, always decided to cook lentil soup (which I hated as a child, now I love 😆), and I guess the tradition stuck because on this hot summer day I’m here stirring and stirring my Mexican frijoles soup.

This soup is traditionally called Tlatlapas which is an ‘easier’ take on cooking dry beans from scratch (that’ll really make your kitchen hot) which I always find way to time consuming and not very satisfying.

 

Recipe:

Easy Bean Soup or Tlatlapas 

500gr of dry beans (any will do)

1/2 onion

1 garlic clove

2 chile arbol

1 chile morita

12 cups of broth or water

olive oil

salt to taste

1. Heat your pan on medium heat and toast your dry beans on low heat, let them cool off and grind them as fine as powder.

2. Fry off your onion and garlic then add the bean powder.

3. Stir until evenly coated and start adding the liquid cup by cup.

4. Stir occasionally until you achieve an even smooth consistency, salt to taste.

Enjoy! Provecho!

There are a lot of known toppings for this soup like nopales in strips, fried strips of chile or epazote. We love this soup with very thin tortilla strips and a mild chile oil. 

Abuela's Note: If you don't have a mortero or metate (the traditional way of grinding grains and beans) you can use a blender. If the powder is not fine enough, cook it through as much as you can and blend it until smooth.

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Salsa Pasilla Tatemada

Salsa Pasilla Tatemada

This salsa has a sweeter tone than other chili salsas. Use this salsa to accompany fish, shellfish or any of your favorite tacos or totopos!

 Ingredients:

2 Casa Mexicana Pasilla chiles

2 tomatoes

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 garlic clove

1/2 onion

Salt to taste

Preparation:

  1. Start by cleaning and removing the chile seeds.
  2. In a pan, start the tatemado process by adding the pasilla chiles first until they’re becoming aromatic about 2 minutes, remove the chiles set them aside, chop the onion in four and add to the pan with the tomatoes and the garlic for about 8 minutes. Move constantly, every 40-60 seconds to avoid burning, we want to achieve a nice char on the vegetables.
  3. Once the tatemado is ready, add all the ingredients to the molcajete or food processer/blender. For a classic chunky consistency pulse for less than 3 seconds three times. For a smooth consistency allow food processer to work for at least 30 seconds continuously. Your first salsa is ready to serve!
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Guajillo Chili, Tequila & Apricot Glazed Turkey

Guajillo Chili, Tequila & Apricot Glazed Turkey

Are you tired of the same old, dry turkey every Christmas? Our Mexican twist on the classic will have you making this turkey year round!

Ingredients

5 Guajillo chiles, stemmed and seeded

3 3/4 cups chicken broth, divided

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted

3 tablespoons tequila

Salt

1 (14-pound) turkey, giblets removed and reserved

1/3 cup apricot preserves (recommended: Bon Maman)

2 teaspoons dried oregano, crumbled

2 cloves garlic

Freshly ground black pepper

Dried apricots, California chiles, fresh cilantro, for garnish

Special equipment: poultry flavor injector (available at gourmet stores)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Place the chiles and 2 cups of chicken broth in medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, and then turn off the heat. Let the chiles stand for 5 to 10 minutes to soften.

Mix 3/4 cup of chicken broth, melted butter, and tequila in a small metal bowl. Season with salt. Using a kitchen flavor injector, inject the mixture into the thighs, breasts, and legs of the turkey. If the mixture solidifies, place the bowl over a gas burner or in a warm oven until the butter melts.

Place the turkey on a rack set in a large roasting pan. Tuck the wing tips under the turkey body. Tie the legs together with kitchen twine. Place the giblets in the pan.

Transfer the chiles with their liquid to a blender. Add the apricot preserves, oregano, and garlic and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Transfer the chile puree to a medium saucepan. Rub about 1 cup of the chile puree all over the turkey (reserve the rest for the sauce at the end), working some of it between the breast and the skin. Season the turkey generously with salt and pepper.

Add 1 cup broth to the roasting pan and roast for 45 minutes.

Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Continue roasting the turkey until a thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 165 degrees F, about 2 hours longer, basting every 20 minutes with drippings. Cover the turkey loosely with foil if it begins to brown.

Transfer the turkey to a platter, reserving the pan juices, and allow to rest while preparing the sauce.

Strain the pan juices into a large, heavy saucepan and discard any solids. Spoon the fat from the top of the liquid and discard. Add the remaining chile puree to the saucepan and stir until well combined. Boil over high heat until slightly thickened, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Recipe Courtesy of Chef Marcela Valladolid, Food Network.

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Mexican Christmas dishes that you'll want to make all year!

Mexican Christmas dishes that you'll want to make all year!

What does Christmas mean to you? Absolutely and under all circumstances for us at Casa Mexico it means food!

In Mexico we have our pre Christmas food, our post Christmas food, we even have a whole Marathon of celebrations and of course more eating named Guadalupe-Reyes all with its own dishes and traditions. So let's get started with the best of Mexican Christmas foods that will inspire you to start cooking!

Tamales

As if we already don't spoil each other enough during Christmas, the wonderful cooks in our families also make edible little gift wrapped food, parcels of joy called Tamales. Depending on the region in Mexico you will find different kinds, for example the south will have theirs wrapped in banana leaves because of their abundance in their tropical climate, the north will have more meat based tamales wrapped in corn husk but all made with the spongiest tamal masa that melts in your mouth. My favorites would have to be the chicken in mole and the pork in salsa verde, see the recipes and ingredients available here!

Pozole

A Pozole is a hearty soup that warms your innards and perhaps your frozen cold heart into loving the Christmas spirit. This very special dish is the king of the plates served during this season, wether it be made of chicken, pork or vegetarian, it can't be served without its Mexican oregano, tostadas, radish, onion and accompanying chili oils, see the recipe and ingredients needed here!

Los Romeritos

Romeritos is a traditional dish from Central Mexico, a romerito is a tender sprig of the sepweed boiled and served with a dark mole sauce, this can be served with potatoes, shrimp or nopales (cactus paddle). The story of the romeritos is a special one with a beginning with the Aztecs, which used to eat them mixed with a small egg variety called ahuautles, which curiously have a very similar taste to the shrimp. During colonization this ingredient formed part of the gastronomy of the convents, one of the reasons why it is eaten during Christmas is because like during Lent it wasn't customary to eat meats during Christmas, resulting in the Romeritos staying in our holiday table! See the recipe and ingredients needed here!

 

Atoles

Of course our Christmas would not be complete without it's own special drinks, an atole is a thick corn based drink that can be spiced with cinnamon, chocolate, or seasonal fruits like tamarind and guayaba. See the recipe and ingredients needed here!

 

 

El Turkey

Yes we also have a turkey or huajolote at the table, but being Mexican and lovers of spice we have beautiful preparations and presentations to the sometimes boring, mostly dry regular Christmas turkey. Have you ever heard of a tequila - Guajillo chili - apricot glazed turkey for Christmas? or a Turkey al Adobo? We have endless ways to make our turkey more exciting, see the recipes and ingredients available here!

Buñuelos

These beautiful crispy treats are quintessential to the Christmas celebrations, also known as hojuelas, they're made from frying flour tortillas then serving them with a delicate piloncillo syrup or cajeta if you're feeling extra naughty, they're basically your dream dessert on a plate. See the recipe and ingredients needed here!

#MexicanChristmas #ChristmasDishes #Tamales #Pozole #Romeritos #Atoles #Buñuelos #TequilaTurkey

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The History of Cajeta + Recipes

The History of Cajeta + Recipes

Since viceregal times, in New Spain milk sweets based on the Iberian tradition have been made. This was thanks to the easy adaptation and proliferation of goats and the difficult coupling of cattle.

At first, it was in the "Bajío" region, as well as in the old "Villa de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción de Celaya" that the use of goat's milk was substituted in the original recipes that were based on cow's milk. This resulted in a recipe and a different sweet that acquired the name "cajeta" due to the wooden boxes in which it was originally stored.

"Mexico is the only place in the world where there is cajeta made with goat's milk."

In September 2010, cajeta was declared: "The dessert of the Mexican Bicentennial"

Why it's better with goats milk?

The biggest difference between the cajeta and the dulce de leche is in the use of goat's milk instead of cow's milk. Is it better?

In fact, goat's milk has benefits such as:

-Natural anti-inflammatory

-Less fat

-Rich in calcium

-More bio-compatibility

All these characteristics make goat's milk stand out as perfect for making a sweet like cajeta, instead of making only dulce de leche like cow's milk. We could also add the most important difference derived from this, the unique flavor.

The history of the cajeta is a story of a new identity of the Mexican people expressed in the differentiation of a traditional Spanish sweet, to give rise to one with a more exquisite and unique flavor using goat's milk.

Recipes with Cajeta

Coyotas de Cajeta (Cajeta Coyotes)

Have you heard of coyotas? Well, we will tell you a little about them: they are one of the typical desserts of Sonora in the North of Mexico and they are filled with cajeta or piloncillo. The name "coyotas" comes from the ancient custom of calling children "coyotitos" in the northwest of the country. Join us this time to prepare some delicious Coyotas de Cajeta.

For the Dough,

1 Kg of flour

2 tablespoons Royal

½ Kg of vegetable shortening

2 piloncillos

¼ liter of water

Filling

1 cup of Cajeta Real del Potosí

4 tablespoons of flour

2 piloncillos

Directions

First, grate 2 piloncillos and separate. Grating them well is important so that they blend perfectly with the other ingredients.

Then, mix 1 kg of flour, 1/4 liter of water, 1/2 kilo of vegetable shortening, 2 tablespoons of royal and the 2 grated piloncillos in a bowl.

Then, knead the mixture until it is compacted and can be handled.

Now knead with a rolling pin to unify the mixture, it should be as homogeneous as possible.

Later, cut circles of the same size (either with a cookie cutter or some other utensil).

Now, to prepare the filling in a bowl, mix 1 cup of cajeta, 2 grated piloncillos and 4 tablespoons of flour until the mixture is homogeneous.

Add the filling mixture to one of the dough circles.

Then close with another circle of dough, and press the edges with a fork to prevent the filling from dripping when baking.

Varnish with a little egg.

Bake at 200ºC for about 20 minutes. or until they look golden.

Enjoy!

Atole de Cajeta

How about a delicious atole to accompany your breakfast? Well, we have a better suggestion: a delicious cajeta atole! Follow our recipe and we assure you that you will have a delicious atole to enhance any morning or night.

Ingredients

Makes about 4 cups

1 liter of milk, can be oat, almond or any nut milk as well

1 cup of Maza Real flour

1 cup of Cajeta Real del Potosí

Directions

First, place 1 liter of milk in a pot and heat it.

Once its temperature has risen a little and it is no longer cold, add 1 cup of cajeta. Dissolve the cajeta, moving the mixture with a small spatula while it is heating.

Then, when the cajeta is dissolved in the milk, add 1 cup of the Maza Real flour and stir again until everything is mixed well.

Now, to serve the atole in a jar or container, place a strainer over the container and serve the atole. This is so that no lumps of flour remain in the atole.

Enjoy!

Recipes and Cajeta History Courtesy of Cajeta Real del Potosí

*All products available for purchase are tagged in the recipes.

#CajetaMexicana #NavidadesMexicanas #ChristmasSpirit

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Pollo en Salsa Verde

Pollo en Salsa Verde

Since you are crazy for Salsa Verde and tomatillo, I thought we should share an easy favorite of chicken in green sauce recipe. Tomatillo the base of Salsa Verde is such an intoxicating flavor that we completely understand the obsession and why it's selling out as quickly as we can restock it!

Ingredients

Makes 4 to 6 servings

¼ cup / 60ml safflower oil, plus more if needed

1 garlic clove

1 whole chicken, cut into 6 pieces

3 Yukon gold potatoes, peeled or not, cut into large (1- to 2-inch / 2.5 to 5cm) chunks

½ white onion, finely diced

2 cups / 480ml Salsa Verde

1 cup / 20g cilantro leaves, finely chopped

Corn Tortillas, warmed

Avocado, for serving

Directions

Warm the oil in a 4 qt / 3.8L Dutch oven or heavy-bottom stockpot over medium-high heat. Skewer the garlic clove on the tines of a fork and swivel it through the hot oil. The oil should be hot enough that the garlic sizzles and turns golden. Once this happens, remove the garlic and set it aside (don’t throw it away).

Add 2 or 3 chicken pieces, skin-side down, to the hot oil. Don’t overcrowd the pan. You are not cooking the chicken through, just searing it, allowing the skin to brown slightly, which brings out the flavor when it stews. The chicken skin will stick at first, but will release fairly easily once it’s done searing. Using tongs or a slotted spoon, flip each piece of chicken to sear the other side. Then remove the seared chicken and set aside on a plate while you continue to sear the rest of the pieces on each side. Set it all aside while you cook the potatoes.

Using the hot oil in the bottom of the pan (add a bit more, if needed), brown the potato chunks just as you did the chicken, adding them in a single layer and allowing them to turn golden on each side before flipping them. You are not cooking the potatoes through, just searing them; this also helps bring out their flavor and keeps them from falling apart in the stew. Once they’re a light golden color, remove them and set them on a plate.

Now take that clove of garlic that you used to swivel in the oil before you cooked your chicken and slice it fairly thinly. Add the sliced garlic to the oil in the pan, along with the onion, and sauté until soft and lightly browned. Strictly speaking, you could skip this step, since the salsa has plenty of flavor, but I really like the texture of the minced onion.

Add the salsa to the pot, along with the chicken pieces and potatoes. Bring it to a boil, cover, decrease the heat, and simmer for about 30 minutes. Cut into a thick piece of chicken and chunk of potato to confirm they’re cooked through. Shred the chicken for best results.

Sprinkle the cilantro over the stew. To serve, scoop the chicken over some tortillas, top with some fresh avocado and cilantro.

The tinga can be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days.

Recipes Tips:

You can also serve this plate with warm refried beans on the side, its a heartwarming meal that will always bring you comfort.

Recipe Courtesy of My Mexico City Kitchen

*All products available for purchase are tagged in the recipe.

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Bloody Maria with Tequila

Bloody Maria with Tequila

In this recipe, traditional Bloody Mary (made with vodka) meets tequila. That single change in the recipe makes a whole difference in the flavor. Unlike vodka, which gets lost in this heavily flavored, spicy drink, the tequila in the background stands out. It adds a smoky earthiness that can only be found in tequila.

From personal experience, the first time I had a Bloody Mary I was astounded at the difference. Since that day, this has become my bloody drink of choice and I encourage all tomato cocktail fans to give this one a try!

Serving: 1

Hot level: Low

Ingredients:

1 shot of tequila

15 ml of lime juice

65 ml of tomato juice / Clamato

Half a stick of celery for garnishing

2 squirts of Worcestershire sauce

1 tablespoon of Valentina Hot Sauce

Salt

Ice

Instructions:

If you’d like to rim your glasses with salt, run a lime around the glass rim and twist it onto a plate with salt. You will get a beautiful rimmed glass with salt. Then fill half of the glass with ice cubes. Add the tequila, two squirts of Worcestershire sauce, the lime juice, one teaspoon of the Diablito hot sauce and salt to taste. Mix the ingredients well with a teaspoon or a metal rod, and then add the tomato juice. You can use Casa México's Clamato, which is a mix of tomato and clam juice. Alternatively, you can make your own fresh tomato juice by simply blending one tomato, half a small cucumber, one clove of garlic, a teaspoon of vinegar, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Once you added the juice, taste and add more Diablito hot sauce for more heat. Finally, garnish with the celery stick or a lime wedge or any crazy garnish you can think of, we've heard of crispy bacon, chili shrimp, whole chilies, the possibilities are endless!

Enjoy!

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Michoacán style fruit salad or “Gazpacho”

Michoacán style fruit salad or “Gazpacho”

Though it shares a name with a Spanish dish, it is nothing like the Spanish tomato soup we generally associate with the term gazpacho.

Morelia is the capital city of Michoacán, a central Pacific state in Mexico, where this delicacy was developed.

Gazpacho, like other fruit salads, is a common street food consisting of a mix of different fruits, hot sauce and chili powder. When the sun out and it is hot outside, your mouth is going to crave this, so please give it a try!

 

Serving: 2

Hot level: Low

Ingredients:

1 cup diced pineapple

1 cup diced cucumber

1 cup diced mango

1 cup diced jicama (jacatupé)

1 ½ cup fresh orange juice

Salt and pepper to taste
Lime to taste
Chilmili Chamoy sauce to taste

Tajin Chili Powder

Instructions:

Combine the pineapple, cucumber, mango, and jicama in a large bowl with the orange juice, add salt and pepper to taste. Cover and place in the fridge to cool for about 60 minutes. Take out the fridge and plate in a small bowl or a tall glass. Drizzle with Chilmili Chamoy sauce, add lime and Tajin chili powder to make it tastier. Serve cold and enjoy!

** Chef's Tip: Jacatupé or jícama is a crispy and sweet edible root, similar to the turnip. It is originally from Mexico. It has a paper-like skin and a whitish interior with a texture similar to that of a potato or raw pear. It tastes a little like green apple. You can find it at international markets that sell exotic roots in Europe. Alternately, if you cannot find jícama you can simply skip this ingredient in the recipe and still enjoy a delicious fruit salad that is worth trying any season.

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Lola's Spicy Paloma Cocktail

Lola's Spicy Paloma Cocktail

Last summer we had a fun pop up idea for a fresh Mexican food concept from Baja California called Lola's Baja Cuisine, just amazing food from our home state, we served fresh ceviches, aguachiles, tostadas, baja fish tacos and even Puerto Nuevo style lobster! Recipes for all that coming soon! but one of the standouts was definitely the Spicy Paloma that kept our friends coming back for more!

This is the same recipe we shared yesterday on Cristina ComVida which was a huge favorite, check out the recipe here!

What is a Paloma? Paloma means dove in Spanish, and it is the most loved cocktail in Mexico after the Margarita. The classic Paloma drink has a clean, crisp flavor of grapefruit that is balanced out by the sugar in the grapefruit soda. Squirt Grapefruit soda is the most commonly used soda because it is so refreshing!

If you are not into sugary sodas or if you are trying to keep your drinking calories low, use fresh grapefruit juice, sparkling water and your sweetener of choice. If you’re using this option you can steep the habaneros in your sweetener until it becomes aromatic and flavored by the habanero, this should be done the night before.

Serving: 1

Hot level: Low

Ingredients for Habanero simple syrup:

3 dried Casa México Habanero chiles or fresh habaneros

1 cup of water 2 cups of sugar

Ingredients for the Paloma:

25 ml of lime juice 2 oz Tequila (blanco) or Mezcal Amáras

4 oz Squirt or grapefruit sparkling water mix

For rim:

Lime or Grapefruit wedge (optional)

Fresh habanero (optional)

Tajin Chili powder Ice

Preparation: 1. Habanero Simple Syrup: Start by adding the water and sugar in a pot and mixing until the sugar dissolves into the water over medium heat. Add the habaneros whole into the pot and bring to a boil, keep stirring until you can smell the habaneros dissolving into the syrup about 10-15 minutes on LOW heat. If you want a more intense flavor chop the habaneros as they will release more spiciness into the syrup. Let it cool before handling, store in a glass container.

2. Rim the glass with Tajin chili powder

3. Place a couple of ice cubes inside the glass 4. Add the tequila, lime juice and add the spicy syrup 5. Pour in the Squirt 6. Stir to combine 7. Garnish with lime wedges or fresh habaneros!

Enjoy!

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Buñuelos with Lavender Piloncillo Syrup

Buñuelos with Lavender Piloncillo Syrup

Have you ever heard of a crunchy, sweet, buttery dessert called Buñuelos? Well you are in luck because at Casa Mexico we are in the Christmas spirit and that means rolling out the dough and making buñuelos!

Ingredients

Makes about 18 buñuelos
10 fresh lavender flowers (optional)
1 7.5 ounce cone Piloncillo
1 cup water

Peel of 1 orange

1 2/3 cups all purpose flour plus 4 tablespoons for dusting

½ cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

1 large egg

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, room temperature

1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla extract

1/3 to ½ cup warm water

Vegetable oil for frying

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

Place lavender, piloncillo, 1 cup water and orange peal in heavy small sauce pan and bring to boil to dissolve piloncillo. Reduce heat to low and let cook 30 minutes to infuse flavors. Cool slightly and strain.

Place 1 2/3 cup flour in large bowl. Whisk in 1 tablespoon of sugar, baking powder and salt. Make a well in the center and add egg, butter and vanilla. Using fingertips, mix until coarse crumbs form. Add warm water, a couple of tablespoons at a time, until dough comes together but is not too sticky. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and shiny, about 5 minutes. Place a little oil on fingertips and coat all of surface of dough with a little oil. Place in medium bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature (not to cold) for 30 minutes.

Divide into 14 to 15 balls, each about a tablespoon of dough. I use a scale, and each is about 1 ounce, but you can eyeball.

Coat each ball lightly with oil again and cover with plastic wrap. Let stand 10 minutes.

Heat enough vegetable oil in skillet to come ½-inch up of the sides of the pan to 350°F. Working with one at a time, and on floured surface, roll each into paper-thin round using a rolling pin and constantly rotating. Fry each individually until golden brown, turning occasionally. Transfer to paper towels to drain.

Mix 1/3 cup of sugar and cinnamon and place on small baking sheet. Stand buñuelo upright on sugar mixture and carefully pour additional sugar all over buñuelos. Serve with syrup.

Recipe from "Casa Marcela" Cookbook.

#BuñuelosMexicanos #NavidadesMexicanas #ChristmasSpirit #Rolloutthedough #Piloncillo

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Pollo Pibil Rápidito

Pollo Pibil Rápidito

Pibil is such a mouth watering word for us Mexicans, we immediately transport ourselves to the beautiful Yucatán Peninsula, where this dish originated, also one of Mexico's most important cuisines, known for its assertive, pungent flavors. Pibil traditionally involves centuries-old traditional methods of cooking which include digging underground pits known as pib in the Mayan language, and burying a full pig wrapped in layers and layers of banana leaves, spices and achiote paste goodness.

Unfortunately we don't all have the privilege of being in the beaches of the Yucatan enjoying a traditionally made pibil, but we do have most everything we need for this Pibil Rapidín recipe below, it can be made with any regular chicken as well as with turkey leftovers from Thanksgiving or Christmas.

Ingredients

Serves 4 to 5 people

8 oz ripe tomatoes

1/4 red onion

3 garlic cloves, unpeeled

1/3 tsp kosher or sea salt

2 cups chicken broth

2 tablespoons canola or sunflower oil

1/4 cup grapefruit juice

1/4 cup orange juice

1/4 cup lime juice

1/4 cup cane sugar vinegar

1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

1/8 teaspoon ground cumin

Freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons achiote paste

6 cups cooked shredded chicken, leftover turkey or rotisserie chicken

Picked Purple Onions with cane sugar vinegar (for serving)

Shredded Cabbage (for serving)

Warmed Komali Tortillas (for serving)

Directions

  1. Preheat the broiler. Line small baking sheet or roasting pan with foil and place the tomatoes, onion and garlic cloves on the foil, set the broiler, 3 to 4 inches from the heat, broil for 4-5 minutes, until charred on one side. Flip over and broil for another 4-5 minutes, until the skin is blistered and completely charred; the tomatoes should be very soft with the juices beginning to seep out. Remove from the heat.

  2. Once everything is cool to handle, quarter the tomatoes and place in a blender, with the juices in the pan. Peel the garlic cloves and add to blender, add the onion, salt and 1 cup of the broth, puree until smooth.

  3. In a casserole or soup pot, heat oil over medium heat. Pour in the puree, stir occasionally for 7-8 min, until it thickens and darkens considerably.

  4. Meanwhile, combine grapefruit, orange and lime juice with vinegar, oregano, allspice, cumin, pepper to taste, achiote paste, and remaining 1 cup of broth in the blender and puree until smooth.

  5. Stir the juice mixture into the tomato sauce, bring to a simmer for 5 min

  6. Add the chicken, stir together and cook uncover until the meat has absorbed most of the sauce about 5 min, the dish should be very moist but not soupy.

  7. Serve the Pibil with a side of lime, pickled purple onions and cabbage, make into tacos, or serve with rice or for quesadillas with our homemade flour tortillas!

 

Recipe Courtesy of “Mexican Today” Cookbook.

*All products available for purchase are tagged in the recipe.

#PibilRapidito #LeftoverIdeas #Everythingbutthekitchensink #EasyRecipes #RecipeoftheWeek

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Rompope de Monjas, the Mexican Eggnog

Rompope de Monjas, the Mexican Eggnog

Rompope is a custardy mixture of eggs, milk, sugar and alcohol (usually a sugarcane alcohol or rum), basically the Mexican equivalent of the American eggnog but better!

The most famous Rompope is made by the nuns or monjas of the Santa Clara Convent in Puebla, because in addition to evangelizing the local population, nuns in convents all over Mexico made the most delicious sweets, mixing European techniques with Mexican ingredients. Convent kitchens were bustling with activity the nuns usually competed with one another for culinary prestige!

Rompope usually contains alcohol but there are versions without, it can also be used instead of milk in a tres leches cake (more on that later;) or simply served on ice.

As we are in the festive spirit, we hope you enjoy your drink with history!

Ingredients

Serves 10 to 12

 

6 cups of milk

3 whole cloves

1 stick of cinnamon

1/2 tsp grated nutmeg

1 tsp Mexican vanilla extract

1 tsp baking soda

1 1/3 cup sugar

12 large egg yolks

3/4 pure sugarcane alcohol like rum, cachaça, brandy or grog to taste

 

Directions

Combine the milk, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla extract and baking soda in a large saucepan, bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 15 - 20 min. Remove from heat, add the sugar but don't stir, allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, make an ice bath by filling a large bowl with ice or ice water.
Whisk the egg yolks in a large bowl until the thicken and are pale yellow 1-2 min. With a whisk or spatula, stir the sugar into the milk, it will dissolve easily now, slowly whisk in the egg yolks.
Rinse out and dry the egg yolk bowl and place in the ice bath. Set a fine sieve or strainer lined with cheesecloth over the bowl.
Return the saucepan to low heat and cook, stirring with a heat-proof spatula, until thickened and creamy; do not allow the mixture to boil. It is ready when it leaves a channel when you run your fingers down the middle of the spatula. Remove from the heat and whisk in the alcohol. Pour through the strainer into the medium bowl and cool completely in the ice bath, stirring occasionally.
Once cool, transfer to a jar or container and refrigerate, serve chilled.
Recipe from "Mexican Today" Cookbook.
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Baja Fish Tacos Ensenada Style

Baja Fish Tacos Ensenada Style

These beer-battered fish tacos are served just how we remember them from childhood, with the tangy crema, vinegary jalapeños and amazing tortillas it will immediately transport you to the magical beaches of my dearest Baja.

For the recipe you can use any type of white flaky fish, cod stands up well to frying but halibut is our favorite. You can also try it with shrimp! For vegetarians you can also replace this with banana blossom or jackfruit which are known to be the best options for replacing fish in this occasion.

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 2 cups plain flour

  • 1 tablespoon mustard

  • 1 teaspoon Mexican oregano

  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, plus more for seasoning

  • 1 cup dark Mexican beer (If you can't find that use any type of similar beer)

  • Vegetable oil, for frying

  • 2 pounds of cod, cut into 5-inch strips (about 16 strips)

  • 1 tablespoon sugar cane white vinegar

  • 1 teaspoon chile de arból oil (made by steeping chile de arból in warm olive oil to desired spiciness)

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

  • 1/2 teaspoon crumbled Mexican oregano

  • 1 cup of shredded white cabbage

  • 1/2 cup of cilantro

  • Corn tortillas, warmed

  • Pickled jalapeños and carrots, for serving

  • Lemon wedges, for serving

  • Mexican crema, for serving (or any type of sour cream or greek yogurt no sugar will do)

  • Thinly sliced red onion, for serving

 

Directions

  1. Combine 1 cup of the flour, Dijon mustard, 1 teaspoon of salt, the oregano and the pepper in a medium bowl, Gradually add the beer and whisk until combined, set aside.

  2. Pour enough vegetable oil into a large, heavy skillet to come 1 inch up the sides of the pan and heat to 180C, Meanwhile, combine the remaining 1 cup of flour and 1 teaspoon salt on a large plate.

  3. Season the fish pieces with salt and pepper and coat with the seasoned flour.

  4. Dip the fillets into the beer batter, then transfer to the skillet and fry in small batches, making sure not to overcrowd the pan, until golden brown and cooked through, about 5 minutes.

  5. Transfer to a paper towel lined plate to drain the excess oil. Repeat with remaining fish.

  6. Combine the vinegar, chile oil, olive oil and oregano in a medium bowl and season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the shredded white cabbage and the cilantro and toss to combine.

  7. To assemble the tacos, place a warm tortilla on each plate, top with fried fish, cabbage and pickled jalapeños, Mexican crema and red onion slices.

  8. Serve immediately!

Recipes Tips:

You can also serve these tacos with an array of salsas on the side, the ones that go best with this dish are a deep chile de arból salsa and a pico de gallo, more recipes to come!

Recipe from Casa Marcela
*All products available for purchase are tagged in the recipe.
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