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Entomatadas alla Pollock

Entomatadas alla Pollock

This simple homey Mexican recipe is a comfort food for all who know it, entomatadas like enchiladas or enfrijoladas or enmoladas, all carry the same idea but a different sauce.

Entomatadas have a simple non spicy tomato sauce that reminds one of hugs from la abuela!

Entomatadas alla Pollock

Tortillas Komali 15cm Tradicional

3 Chile Guajillo

2 Chile Arbol

3 tomatoes

1/2 onion

1 garlic 

Oil for frying

salt to taste 

Fillings: shredded chicken, cheese, or beans

Toppings: crema, chile oil, lettuce, crumbly cheese

Instructions:

1. Prepare your salsa, clean your chiles by taking out the seeds and veins, soak them in hot water until soft. Add all tomatoes, onion, garlic and chiles in your blender and blend until very smooth, salt to taste. 

2. Fry off your salsa until it gets a bright red color, then fry off your tortillas until they become flexible and soft. Set them aside.

3. Set up your plate with some salsa at the bottom, dip the tortillas in the salsa and fill them with your desired filling

4. Top them with more salsa and your desired toppings.

Provecho!

Abuela’s Tip: Anytime you’re making salsa Macha or chile oil in your blender is a good time to make this simple tomato sauce, since your blender will be coated with an amazing residual goodness, blend the tomatoes/onion/garlic to clean out your blender and make this recipe without using extra Chiles.

 

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Easy Bean Soup or Tlatlapas

Easy Bean Soup or Tlatlapas

Why on this hot Summer day are we craving soup, you may ask?

As early as I remember my mother bless her heart, always decided to cook lentil soup (which I hated as a child, now I love 😆), and I guess the tradition stuck because on this hot summer day I’m here stirring and stirring my Mexican frijoles soup.

This soup is traditionally called Tlatlapas which is an ‘easier’ take on cooking dry beans from scratch (that’ll really make your kitchen hot) which I always find way to time consuming and not very satisfying.

 

Recipe:

Easy Bean Soup or Tlatlapas 

500gr of dry beans (any will do)

1/2 onion

1 garlic clove

2 chile arbol

1 chile morita

12 cups of broth or water

olive oil

salt to taste

1. Heat your pan on medium heat and toast your dry beans on low heat, let them cool off and grind them as fine as powder.

2. Fry off your onion and garlic then add the bean powder.

3. Stir until evenly coated and start adding the liquid cup by cup.

4. Stir occasionally until you achieve an even smooth consistency, salt to taste.

Enjoy! Provecho!

There are a lot of known toppings for this soup like nopales in strips, fried strips of chile or epazote. We love this soup with very thin tortilla strips and a mild chile oil. 

Abuela's Note: If you don't have a mortero or metate (the traditional way of grinding grains and beans) you can use a blender. If the powder is not fine enough, cook it through as much as you can and blend it until smooth.

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Summer Favorite, Baja Fish Tacos!

Summer Favorite, Baja Fish Tacos!

One of our favorite meals in the whole wide world is Baja Shrimp Tacos, these delicacies are an explosion of flavor for any discerning palate!

 

Baja Fish Tacos a la Casa Mexicana 

Ingredients:

  • Komali Tortillas Taquera 500gr
  • Fish filets, white firm fish like pescada, this can be done with shrimp
  • 2 cups of flour
  • ½ tsp of baking powder
  • 1 tsp of salt
  • ½ tsp of pepper
  • ½ tsp of garlic powder
  • ½ cup of cold dark beer (ideally this is Negra Modelo or any lager style beer)
  • Oil for frying 

Step 1: Prepare your fish filets, they should be around 1 inch wide and 4-inch-long strips, we want the fish to fit in our taco because it will gain extra padding with the batter. Pat dry your fish and store in a container wrapped with a paper towel.

Step 2: Prepare the batter, add a cup of flour, ½ tsp of baking powder, a tsp of salt, a ½ tsp of pepper and ½ tsp of garlic powder, ½ cup of cold dark beer. Mix the flour salt and dry condiments in a medium bowl, gradually add the cold beer while whisking, do not over work the batter, you can leave some small lumps of flour it will help with crispiness. The consistency of the batter should be that of a thick pancake batter. Best to let the batter rest for 5-10 min allowing the baking powder to activate which will make for a crispier batter.

Step 3: Heat your oil in a deep pan it should be deep enough to cover the fish 90%, to test the heat of your oil, put a tiny bit of your beer batter in the oil, when the oil is ready the batter will float and be golden brown.

Step 4: Take your fish out of the fridge make sure no condensation has formed any water will make the oil splatter, salt and pepper the fish, first dip them in the white flour, then in the beer batter, slowly release them into the hot oil, fry until golden about 3-4 minutes, don’t overcrowd the pan, place your crispy fish on a cooling rack to keep the coating nice and crisp!

Enjoy with toppings like pico de gallo, thinly sliced cabbage, guacamole and chipotle crema!

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Step-by-step guide to the best Holiday Tamales!

Step-by-step guide to the best Holiday Tamales!

The word tamal comes from the Nahuatl tamalli which means wrapped. This delicious dish is of indigenous origin, prepared with cooked corn dough and wrapped in leaves of different plants (banana, corn, maguey, among others). Stuffed with vegetables, chili, sauce, meat, chicken or fruit, sweet or savory, for all tastes! Tamales are the most popular among Mexicans.

They say there are between 500 and 5,000 different tamales across the country. Can you imagine all those flavors?

It is a delicious part of the Mexican traditional dishes, In Mexico we eat them on many important occasions, like the Day of the dead, when life and death are celebrated, tamales are put on altars as offerings to the dead and enjoyed in the company of our loved ones. We also celebrate Candlemas day; On February 2, the person who receives the Baby Jesus figurine in their Rosca de Reyes needs to invite everyone for tamales.

These are some of the tamal varieties from all over Mexico, the possibilities are really endless, they estimate that per year the production and sale of tamales around the country is in the hundreds of millions!

Holiday Tamales Recipe

Ingredients:

  • Tamal leaf
  • Tamal Flour Maseca 1kg
  • Isadora Beans
  • Rajas Jalapeño
  • If you chose the filling rajas con queso: 200 gr of white cheese (we recommend queijo flamengo, gouda or mozzarella)
  • 4-5 cups of chicken or vegetable broth
  • 2 cups of shortening veg or pork lard, you can also sub with a cup of oil
  • 1 tablespoon of baking powder
  • 2 liters of water
  • Fine Salt 

Equipment Needed

Below is the list of tools needed to make the recipe,

  • 1 large tall stockpot (for steaming the tamales)
  • Steamer basket
  • 2 large bowls
  • Electric Mixer (optional for whipping the shortening/lard)
  • 1 small pot (for making broth)
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Cutting board
  • Knife

Prep for Tamales:

Step 1: Soak the corn husks tamal leaf

Rinse the corn husks to remove any debris, then place into a large bowl and cover them with cold water. Let them soak for at least one hour.

Step 3: Prep your broth

If you’re making fresh broth, please prepare before hand, if you’re making broth from bouillon cubes make sure its cool to touch by the time of the workshop.

Step 2: Whip your shortening or pork lard

Make sure the vegetable shortening or pork lard is at room temperature for easy handling, the traditional way to whip the shortening/lard to achieve fluffy tamales is to do it by hand which takes 10-15 minutes, but to simplify this step use an electric mixer on medium to high speed for around 2-3 minutes. If you don’t have an electric mixer, you can whip the shortening/lard by hand, the technique is to melt it with the warmth of your hands, by squishing it and tossing it back on the bowl, repeat this for 10-15 minutes. The shortening/lard should look white, light and creamy, adding volume to the shortening/lard will yield a lighter masa for tamales.

Make the Tamales!

STEP 1: MAKE THE DOUGH

Measure out two to three cups of broth, set the whipped shortening, pork lard, or oil on your workspace and in a large bowl, put 3 cups of the tamal flour, with your hands gradually alternate between adding the shortening and the broth. Mix until the masa is uniform and light, the texture should be that of a thick cake batter.

Pro tip: For a foolproof dough, there is a float test! Take a small chunk of your dough and drop it into a cold cup of water, the dough should float, if it doesn’t you have to keep working it!

STEP 2: PREP YOUR FILLING

Today you had two options for filling, Rajas con Queso and Beans with chipotle.

For the rajas con queso, we have provided you a can of rajas which already comes cut in strips, please drain and properly shake out the water, we don’t want soggy tamales.

For the beans and chipotle, open the packet of beans and put the beans in a small bowl. Open the can of chipotle, take out the chilies in the chipotle can and cut them into manageable strips to add to your tamales.

STEP 3: ASSEMBLE THE TAMALES

Drain the tamal leaves that have been soaking for the last hour, and pat them dry, then we will fill them assembly line-style:

  • On the wide end of the husk, with a spoon spread 3 tablespoons dough to within 1/2 inch of the edges
  • Top each with 2 rajas and 1 strip of cheese OR 2 tablespoons of beans and 1 strip of chipotle
  • Fold the long sides of the husk over the filling. Make sure they overlap slightly for a secure closure
  • Fold the narrow end of husk over
  • Tie with a strip of husk to secure
  • Repeat until all of the husks are filled and secured 

Pro tip: Treat your spoon like a paint brush and your filling like the paint on the corn husk, put the leaf up to the light and if there are noticeable gaps on the leaf not covered by the dough then you need to cover those. In my family we don’t like to make fat tamales, so a thin even layer of dough on the leaf is optimal.

STEP 4: STEAM

Place a large steamer basket in a your stockpot over 1 in. of water. Place the tamales upright in the steamer and cover with remaining tamal leaves. Bring the water to a boil. Let them steam, covered, for 45 minutes to an hour.

Pro tip: This is a long steam, and water level will drop as the water boils off. Be sure to check on the water frequently, add more water as needed. You don’t want the pot to boil dry; this can damage the pot and makes for sad tamales. Mexican grandmas sometimes put a coin at the bottom of the pot so that it rattles when the water is getting low!

To see if they are cooked take one tamal out let it cool for 5-10 minutes and if the dough peels away cleanly from the leaf its ready, if the dough is still soft steam for another 15-20 minutes.

Tamales of the variety that we’ve just made can be served with salsa on top or sour cream, you can also enjoy these for breakfast with a fried egg on top!

To reheat them, place them in a plate still wrapped in their corn husk in and microwave for 2-3 minutes or take them out of their corn husk and lightly fry them on a pan, they will develop a crunchy exterior!

 

Pro tip: Uncooked tamales can be frozen for later, just be sure to pack them tightly in freezer bags before freezing. To serve, thaw in the refrigerator overnight, and then steam for for 45 minutes to an hour.

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Mexican Christmas dishes that you'll want to make all year!

Mexican Christmas dishes that you'll want to make all year!

What does Christmas mean to you? Absolutely and under all circumstances for us at Casa Mexico it means food!

In Mexico we have our pre Christmas food, our post Christmas food, we even have a whole Marathon of celebrations and of course more eating named Guadalupe-Reyes all with its own dishes and traditions. So let's get started with the best of Mexican Christmas foods that will inspire you to start cooking!

Tamales

As if we already don't spoil each other enough during Christmas, the wonderful cooks in our families also make edible little gift wrapped food, parcels of joy called Tamales. Depending on the region in Mexico you will find different kinds, for example the south will have theirs wrapped in banana leaves because of their abundance in their tropical climate, the north will have more meat based tamales wrapped in corn husk but all made with the spongiest tamal masa that melts in your mouth. My favorites would have to be the chicken in mole and the pork in salsa verde, see the recipes and ingredients available here!

Pozole

A Pozole is a hearty soup that warms your innards and perhaps your frozen cold heart into loving the Christmas spirit. This very special dish is the king of the plates served during this season, wether it be made of chicken, pork or vegetarian, it can't be served without its Mexican oregano, tostadas, radish, onion and accompanying chili oils, see the recipe and ingredients needed here!

Los Romeritos

Romeritos is a traditional dish from Central Mexico, a romerito is a tender sprig of the sepweed boiled and served with a dark mole sauce, this can be served with potatoes, shrimp or nopales (cactus paddle). The story of the romeritos is a special one with a beginning with the Aztecs, which used to eat them mixed with a small egg variety called ahuautles, which curiously have a very similar taste to the shrimp. During colonization this ingredient formed part of the gastronomy of the convents, one of the reasons why it is eaten during Christmas is because like during Lent it wasn't customary to eat meats during Christmas, resulting in the Romeritos staying in our holiday table! See the recipe and ingredients needed here!

 

Atoles

Of course our Christmas would not be complete without it's own special drinks, an atole is a thick corn based drink that can be spiced with cinnamon, chocolate, or seasonal fruits like tamarind and guayaba. See the recipe and ingredients needed here!

 

 

El Turkey

Yes we also have a turkey or huajolote at the table, but being Mexican and lovers of spice we have beautiful preparations and presentations to the sometimes boring, mostly dry regular Christmas turkey. Have you ever heard of a tequila - Guajillo chili - apricot glazed turkey for Christmas? or a Turkey al Adobo? We have endless ways to make our turkey more exciting, see the recipes and ingredients available here!

Buñuelos

These beautiful crispy treats are quintessential to the Christmas celebrations, also known as hojuelas, they're made from frying flour tortillas then serving them with a delicate piloncillo syrup or cajeta if you're feeling extra naughty, they're basically your dream dessert on a plate. See the recipe and ingredients needed here!

#MexicanChristmas #ChristmasDishes #Tamales #Pozole #Romeritos #Atoles #Buñuelos #TequilaTurkey

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The History of Cajeta + Recipes

The History of Cajeta + Recipes

Since viceregal times, in New Spain milk sweets based on the Iberian tradition have been made. This was thanks to the easy adaptation and proliferation of goats and the difficult coupling of cattle.

At first, it was in the "Bajío" region, as well as in the old "Villa de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción de Celaya" that the use of goat's milk was substituted in the original recipes that were based on cow's milk. This resulted in a recipe and a different sweet that acquired the name "cajeta" due to the wooden boxes in which it was originally stored.

"Mexico is the only place in the world where there is cajeta made with goat's milk."

In September 2010, cajeta was declared: "The dessert of the Mexican Bicentennial"

Why it's better with goats milk?

The biggest difference between the cajeta and the dulce de leche is in the use of goat's milk instead of cow's milk. Is it better?

In fact, goat's milk has benefits such as:

-Natural anti-inflammatory

-Less fat

-Rich in calcium

-More bio-compatibility

All these characteristics make goat's milk stand out as perfect for making a sweet like cajeta, instead of making only dulce de leche like cow's milk. We could also add the most important difference derived from this, the unique flavor.

The history of the cajeta is a story of a new identity of the Mexican people expressed in the differentiation of a traditional Spanish sweet, to give rise to one with a more exquisite and unique flavor using goat's milk.

Recipes with Cajeta

Coyotas de Cajeta (Cajeta Coyotes)

Have you heard of coyotas? Well, we will tell you a little about them: they are one of the typical desserts of Sonora in the North of Mexico and they are filled with cajeta or piloncillo. The name "coyotas" comes from the ancient custom of calling children "coyotitos" in the northwest of the country. Join us this time to prepare some delicious Coyotas de Cajeta.

For the Dough,

1 Kg of flour

2 tablespoons Royal

½ Kg of vegetable shortening

2 piloncillos

¼ liter of water

Filling

1 cup of Cajeta Real del Potosí

4 tablespoons of flour

2 piloncillos

Directions

First, grate 2 piloncillos and separate. Grating them well is important so that they blend perfectly with the other ingredients.

Then, mix 1 kg of flour, 1/4 liter of water, 1/2 kilo of vegetable shortening, 2 tablespoons of royal and the 2 grated piloncillos in a bowl.

Then, knead the mixture until it is compacted and can be handled.

Now knead with a rolling pin to unify the mixture, it should be as homogeneous as possible.

Later, cut circles of the same size (either with a cookie cutter or some other utensil).

Now, to prepare the filling in a bowl, mix 1 cup of cajeta, 2 grated piloncillos and 4 tablespoons of flour until the mixture is homogeneous.

Add the filling mixture to one of the dough circles.

Then close with another circle of dough, and press the edges with a fork to prevent the filling from dripping when baking.

Varnish with a little egg.

Bake at 200ºC for about 20 minutes. or until they look golden.

Enjoy!

Atole de Cajeta

How about a delicious atole to accompany your breakfast? Well, we have a better suggestion: a delicious cajeta atole! Follow our recipe and we assure you that you will have a delicious atole to enhance any morning or night.

Ingredients

Makes about 4 cups

1 liter of milk, can be oat, almond or any nut milk as well

1 cup of Maza Real flour

1 cup of Cajeta Real del Potosí

Directions

First, place 1 liter of milk in a pot and heat it.

Once its temperature has risen a little and it is no longer cold, add 1 cup of cajeta. Dissolve the cajeta, moving the mixture with a small spatula while it is heating.

Then, when the cajeta is dissolved in the milk, add 1 cup of the Maza Real flour and stir again until everything is mixed well.

Now, to serve the atole in a jar or container, place a strainer over the container and serve the atole. This is so that no lumps of flour remain in the atole.

Enjoy!

Recipes and Cajeta History Courtesy of Cajeta Real del Potosí

*All products available for purchase are tagged in the recipes.

#CajetaMexicana #NavidadesMexicanas #ChristmasSpirit

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Romeritos with Nopales, your new Christmas favorite!

Romeritos with Nopales, your new Christmas favorite!

Are you tired of the same old Christmas dishes every year? Do you want to debut a dish that will be a definite showstopper? How about a traditional Mexican dish called Romeritos made with Nopales, or Mexican cactus paddle. It is a dish that will WOW everyone and will appease even the Vegans at your Christmas table!

Romeritos con Nopales

Ingredients

(Serves 2 to 4 people)
4 cups rosemary or romeritos
2 cups Doña Rosa nopalitos (cactus paddle), cut into strips
1/2 white onions
1 pinch sodium bicarbonate/baking soda
2 cups potatoes, peeled
1 cup dry shrimp
1 egg
Enough oil to fry
Salt to taste

Directions

Place the romeritos in a saucepan with water to cover, cook them over medium heat without being completely cooked.

In a pot, place the nopales and the onions, cover with water and the pinch of sodium bicarbonate/baking soda, together with salt. Let them boil over high heat, reduce the flame, cover and cook over low heat until soft, 15-20 minutes.
Cook the potatoes in boiling water until they soften and you can easily chop them with a fork, about 15 minutes.
Cut the heads and tails of the shrimp and reserve them. Soak the shrimp in hot water for 10 minutes.
Dry grind the heads and shrimp tails, beat the egg to the nougat point and mix it with the shrimp power, form pancakes and fry in oil.

In a large pot, dissolve the Doña Maria Mole Poblano Paste in the water in which the shrimp soaked. Add the romeritos, nopales, potatoes and shrimp. Cook over medium heat and season with salt to taste.

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Buñuelos with Lavender Piloncillo Syrup

Buñuelos with Lavender Piloncillo Syrup

Have you ever heard of a crunchy, sweet, buttery dessert called Buñuelos? Well you are in luck because at Casa Mexico we are in the Christmas spirit and that means rolling out the dough and making buñuelos!

Ingredients

Makes about 18 buñuelos
10 fresh lavender flowers (optional)
1 7.5 ounce cone Piloncillo
1 cup water

Peel of 1 orange

1 2/3 cups all purpose flour plus 4 tablespoons for dusting

½ cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

1 large egg

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, room temperature

1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla extract

1/3 to ½ cup warm water

Vegetable oil for frying

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

Place lavender, piloncillo, 1 cup water and orange peal in heavy small sauce pan and bring to boil to dissolve piloncillo. Reduce heat to low and let cook 30 minutes to infuse flavors. Cool slightly and strain.

Place 1 2/3 cup flour in large bowl. Whisk in 1 tablespoon of sugar, baking powder and salt. Make a well in the center and add egg, butter and vanilla. Using fingertips, mix until coarse crumbs form. Add warm water, a couple of tablespoons at a time, until dough comes together but is not too sticky. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and shiny, about 5 minutes. Place a little oil on fingertips and coat all of surface of dough with a little oil. Place in medium bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature (not to cold) for 30 minutes.

Divide into 14 to 15 balls, each about a tablespoon of dough. I use a scale, and each is about 1 ounce, but you can eyeball.

Coat each ball lightly with oil again and cover with plastic wrap. Let stand 10 minutes.

Heat enough vegetable oil in skillet to come ½-inch up of the sides of the pan to 350°F. Working with one at a time, and on floured surface, roll each into paper-thin round using a rolling pin and constantly rotating. Fry each individually until golden brown, turning occasionally. Transfer to paper towels to drain.

Mix 1/3 cup of sugar and cinnamon and place on small baking sheet. Stand buñuelo upright on sugar mixture and carefully pour additional sugar all over buñuelos. Serve with syrup.

Recipe from "Casa Marcela" Cookbook.

#BuñuelosMexicanos #NavidadesMexicanas #ChristmasSpirit #Rolloutthedough #Piloncillo

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Why you'll want to make Pozole for your next fiesta!

Why you'll want to make Pozole for your next fiesta!

Pozole is one of Mexico's most famous meals in a bowl, it's a favorite for the holidays, and any kind of parties! And as many party dishes conveniently its even better when prepared a day ahead, allowing you to sit, relax and enjoy your friends and family while the pozole simmers in the stove ready to serve.

 You can make it with chicken or pork or both, as well as white, green or red, the colors of our beautiful flag :) why it's also a dish that is served for our Fiestas Patrias, the 16th of September, contrary to popular belief not on the 5th of May. So now you can make your own pozole for your special celebrations, because pozole means sharing, happiness, laughter and of course lots of compliments after dinner!

Ingredients

Serves 12

 3 29-oz cans of hominy, drained and rinsed

2 3-pound chickens, cut into serving pieces (For Pork Pozole, substitute with 6-pounds pork shoulder/butt)

1 white onion
5 cilantro sprigs

Kosher or coarse sea salt

For the Chile Puree (what makes it red and spicy good),

2 ancho chiles, rinsed, stemmed and seeded

3 guajillo chiles, rinsed, stemme d and seeded

1/4 cup chopped white onion

3 garlic cloves

Pinch of ground cumin

2 whole cloves

1 teaspoon Kosher or coarse sea salt

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Accompaniments, as desired

5-6 limes
10 radishes, halved and thinly sliced

1 head romaine lettuce, thinly sliced

1/2 cup chopped white onion in small cubes

Dried ground chile, such as piquín

Dried Mexican oregano

Tortilla chips or tostadas

Refried beans

Directions

Place the chickens in a large pot and add water to cover by at least 2 inches. Add the onion, cilantro and 1 tablespoon of salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, partially covered, until the chicken is cooked through and tender, about 40 minutes. Drain, reserving cooking broth.

When the chicken is cool enough to handle, remove skin and bones and shred into bite-sized pieces. In the pot, combine the hominy and 2 cups of water with the shredded chicken and its broth. Taste for salt, add more if necessary and cook for 10 minutes or more; the pozole should be soupy.

Mexican cook's trick: Keep in mind that if you decide to substitute for the Pork option, the pork takes twice as long to cook, reserve the broth to add to the pozole.

For Chile Puree,

Place the chiles in a medium saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Simmer for 10 minutes or until soft. Place the chiles, along with 3.4 cups of their cooking liquid, the onion, garlic, cumin, cloves and salt in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Pass the puree through a fine-mesh strainer into a bowl, pressing on the solids with the back of the wooden spoon to extract as much liquid and essence as possible.

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the chile puree and bring to a boil, then simmer for 6-8 minutes, partially covered with a lid (because it will be pungently good you may cry), stirring occasionally, until thickened, remove from the heat.

Stir in the chile puree to the while pozole and cook for 20 minutes for the flavors to fully macerate. Taste and adjust the salt.

Serve the pozole in large soup bowls, with the garnishes in bowls on the table so guests can customize their pozole experience.

Hominy, or maíz cacahuacintle, also known as giant white corn or maíz mote pelado, looks like corn kernels gone wild. White and super meaty, these giant kernes are an excellent and healthy choice for any stew our soup. Hominy is rich in Vitamin b, has about 4g of fiber per single cup, almost half the calories than white rice (120 calories vs. 250 calories in rice), naturally gluten-free and virtually zero fat (1 gram per cup).

Recipe Courtesy of "Pati's Mexican Table" Cookbook.

Check out our online shop to stock up on the products needed for this recipe here or follow the links directly on the ingredients section!

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Rompope de Monjas, the Mexican Eggnog

Rompope de Monjas, the Mexican Eggnog

Rompope is a custardy mixture of eggs, milk, sugar and alcohol (usually a sugarcane alcohol or rum), basically the Mexican equivalent of the American eggnog but better!

The most famous Rompope is made by the nuns or monjas of the Santa Clara Convent in Puebla, because in addition to evangelizing the local population, nuns in convents all over Mexico made the most delicious sweets, mixing European techniques with Mexican ingredients. Convent kitchens were bustling with activity the nuns usually competed with one another for culinary prestige!

Rompope usually contains alcohol but there are versions without, it can also be used instead of milk in a tres leches cake (more on that later;) or simply served on ice.

As we are in the festive spirit, we hope you enjoy your drink with history!

Ingredients

Serves 10 to 12

 

6 cups of milk

3 whole cloves

1 stick of cinnamon

1/2 tsp grated nutmeg

1 tsp Mexican vanilla extract

1 tsp baking soda

1 1/3 cup sugar

12 large egg yolks

3/4 pure sugarcane alcohol like rum, cachaça, brandy or grog to taste

 

Directions

Combine the milk, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla extract and baking soda in a large saucepan, bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 15 - 20 min. Remove from heat, add the sugar but don't stir, allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, make an ice bath by filling a large bowl with ice or ice water.
Whisk the egg yolks in a large bowl until the thicken and are pale yellow 1-2 min. With a whisk or spatula, stir the sugar into the milk, it will dissolve easily now, slowly whisk in the egg yolks.
Rinse out and dry the egg yolk bowl and place in the ice bath. Set a fine sieve or strainer lined with cheesecloth over the bowl.
Return the saucepan to low heat and cook, stirring with a heat-proof spatula, until thickened and creamy; do not allow the mixture to boil. It is ready when it leaves a channel when you run your fingers down the middle of the spatula. Remove from the heat and whisk in the alcohol. Pour through the strainer into the medium bowl and cool completely in the ice bath, stirring occasionally.
Once cool, transfer to a jar or container and refrigerate, serve chilled.
Recipe from "Mexican Today" Cookbook.
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